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Aid and Attendance

Pension

VA Disability Pension (which includes Aid and Attendance) is a benefit paid to wartime Veterans who have limited or no income, and who are age 65 or older, or, if under 65, who are permanently and totally disabled due to non-service-connected conditions. Before a claim for Aid and Attendance may be awarded, a Veteran or surviving spouse must first meet the Disability Pension eligibility requirements. VA Disability Pension is unlike traditional pensions that are based on years of employment or service with a company or organization. Veterans who are more seriously disabled may qualify for increased benefits based on Aid and Attendance or being Housebound. Housebound benefits provide a lower monthly payment than Aid and Attendance benefits, therefore the strategy involves submitting a claim for Aid and Attendance with Housebound constituting a second option the VA may consider.

These benefits are also available to a widow or widower who was married to a wartime Veteran and who has not remarried, except under limited circumstances.

Who is Eligible?

A Veteran may be eligible for pension with an additional award for Aid and Attendance if:

● The Veteran served at least 90 days of active military service, 1 day of which was during a wartime period; or if the Veteran entered active duty after September 7, 1980, and served at least 24 months or the full period for which called or ordered to active duty (there are exceptions to this rule), 1 day of which was during a wartime period; AND

● The Veteran was discharged from service under conditions other than dishonorable; AND
The Veteran’s countable family income is below a yearly limit set by law (the yearly limit on income is set by Congress); AND


● The Veteran is age 65 or older OR permanently and totally disabled, and now requires the assistance of another person as explained more fully below.

Surviving Spouse

A surviving spouse of a wartime Veteran may be eligible for Death Pension with an additional award for Aid and Attendance if the deceased Veteran met the wartime, active duty and discharge requirements above, the surviving spouse has limited income and assets, and is over 65 or disabled and requires the assistance of another person as explained more fully below.

What is Countable Income for Pension Eligibility Purposes?

Countable income is income received by the Veteran and his or her dependents, if any, from most sources, including earnings, disability and retirement payments, interest and dividends, and net income from farming or business. For VA pension eligibility purposes, a dependent includes a spouse, therefore the income of the Veteran and spouse are included as countable income.

What is Net Worth?

Net worth means the net value of the assets of the Veteran and his or her dependents. It includes such assets as bank accounts, stocks, bonds, mutual funds, and any property other than the Veteran’s residence and a reasonable lot area. There is no set limit on how much net worth a Veteran and his dependents can have, but net worth cannot be excessive. The decision as to whether a claimant’s net worth is excessive depends on the facts of each individual case. All net worth should be reported and the VA will determine if a claimant’s assets are sufficiently large that the claimant could live off these assets for a reasonable period of time. The VA’s needs-based programs are not intended to protect substantial assets or build up an estate for the benefit of heirs.

How Does the VA Calculate the Pension Amount?

Total all countable income. Then subtract any out-of-pocket recurring medical expenses. The remaining countable income is deducted from the appropriate annual pension limit, which is determined by the number of dependents, if any, and whether or not the Veteran is entitled to Housebound or Aid and Attendance benefits. This amount is then divided by 12 and rounded down to the nearest dollar. This gives you the amount of the monthly payment. (See Pension Benefit Charts, below)

How Do I Apply?

We can review individual qualifications and provide advice and assistance in obtaining valuable VA benefits.
Documents to provide: Discharge papers, copies of marriage certificates, copies of medical records, and a detailed list of all recurring medical expenses. A copy of the Veteran’s death certificate is needed for a surviving spouse’s application for benefits.

Pension Benefits Charts

2017 Pension Benefit Figures—Wartime Veteran

Type of Benefits Max. Annual Pension Rate (Income Limit)
Max. Monthly Pension Rate (Income Limit)
Service Pension, No Dependents $12,907 $1,075
Service Pension, One Dependent $16,902 $1,408
Housebound No Dependents $15,773 $1,314
Housebound, One Dependent $19,7700 $1,647
Aid and Attendance, No Dependents $21,531 $1,794
Aid and Attendance, One Dependent $25,525 $2,127
Each additional dependent child +$2,205 +$183

2017 Pension Benefit Figures—Surviving Spouse

Type of Benefits Max. Annual Pension Rate (Income Limit)
Max. Monthly Pension Rate (Income Limit)
Death Pension, No Dependents $8,656 $721
Death Pension, One Dependent $11,330 $944
Housebound No Dependents $10,580 $881
Housebound, One Dependent $13,249 $1,104
Aid and Attendance, No Dependents $13,836 $1,153
Aid and Attendance, One Dependent $16,506 $1,375
Each additional dependent child +$2,198 +$183

How to access your benefits:
(1) Go to the VA
(2) Ask a Veteran Service Organization to fill out the form for you
(3) Begin with the end in mind with an elder law attorney accredited by the VA

Information and Educational. Not legal advice.